Read through the EULA, still don't know if I am allowed to use 2d prints of models for commercial purposes


(Unlike Ordinary) #1

Mugs, t_shirt, Hoodies, whatever, you name it. Do they apply as “media” as stated in https://sketchfab.com/licenses#rights ?

“you may use the 3D asset worldwide, on all types of media, for all types of use (whether commercial and non-commercial), in all types of derivative works.”

but

“For similar reasons, you may not distribute the 3D asset incorporated in a derivative work if the derivative work is too similar to the 3D asset (for instance, you may not print a 3D asset or a slightly modified version of it and sell it).”

So I am actually only allowed to create derivatives of the asset? Or does this only apply if it is still 3d and I want to commecialise the model itself? Furthermore I could’t find anything about printing stuff on mechandise/appliances whatever in the fine print. Neither a forum search brought up results.

Any input greatly appreciated!

thx


(Nebulousflynn) #2

Hi @UnlikeOrdinary - I think you’ve got the right idea.

If you purchase a model from the Sketchfab Store under the Standard license you can use that model to create derivative images to print on a tee-shirt etc.

As you note, the image would need to be a derivative artwork - you are not allowed to simply print a 2D version of the model on it’s own.


(Unlike Ordinary) #3

Hi I there, thanks a lot for the reply @nebulousFlynn

So what’s written here under “what’s a derivative work?” is allowed?

So the original model in a 2D print can be still recognizable and be combined with other still recognizable models? Or do you have for example to change their appearance to some certain degree? If not, I don’t think that putting an unchanged model in front of, for example, a red circle is enough to call it a derivative work?

Are there any guidelines regarding this published by sketchfab? Example pictures would be of great help or a rule of thumb where best to draw the line (pun intended).

Thanks again.


(Nebulousflynn) #4

That article offers some good guidelines. We will consider providing some examples of derivative works in our help center docs. Do you have a specific example of what you wish or intend to do?

So the original model in a 2D print can be still recognizable and be combined with other still recognizable models?

I’m not a lawyer so all I can say is ‘it depends’ - I assume a row of unchanged models is just the same as a single unchanged model.

Or do you have for example to change their appearance to some certain degree?

Again, as a non-lawyer, my answer would be yes.

I don’t think that putting an unchanged model in front of, for example, a red circle is enough to call it a derivative work?

Sounds correct.

It seems like you have a good grasp on the idea: that essentially a derivative work should significantly edit and/or re-contextualize the licensed 3D work.


(Bart) #5

Please also note that the license you mention applies only to Store models with a Royalty Free/Standard license - NOT to free models that you download with a Creative Commons license. These may have other restrictions.


(Unlike Ordinary) #6

Just one more thing for clarification:

So it is not like on other sites that one can do whatever one wants to do 2D wise as long as it is already rendered? Meaning I can do everything with my rendered 2D creations but not sell the meshes/textures themselves? Even in the case of a 2D rendered image the models would have to be altered in some (actually unknown) way?

Are there examples of derivative works yet?


(Bart) #7

No, you’ll have to follow the license of the model:

  • Not downloadable, not in store - you have no rights to re-sell
  • Creative Commons download - use allowed only if you follow the requirements of the license AND if the license is not ‘non-commercial’.
  • Store - only allowed for models with Standard licenses, not for Editorial licenses.